Goings on in the Garden: August 2018

26 August 2018
So close to spring and yet still so far really. I skipped my garden round-up last month as we were away and to be honest, there wasn't much going on. Canberra winter is not conducive to garden happenings. However, this month I'm happy to report a bit of growth and also a few signs of spring...yay!





As evidenced by the above picture we have lemons. This tree was a Christmas gift and I'm happy to be able to harvest a few offerings in it's first season. One has already been picked and used, so these three will bring the total harvest to four. Nothing to sneeze at.


Brassicas, parsely and mangel wurzel in the bathtub. These guys get good frost protection as they are up higher and against a brick wall. Still, they are growing pretty slowly. Once I harvest these at the end of the season I'll give the soil in here a good refresh before planting out again.


 The finger lime has not been so keen on the frost. No surprises there. However, the side that is squished up against the bush is still looking ok so hopefully it will bounce back.


 Once of many broccoli plants. Am able to get a small harvest from these guys. I suspect once the warm weather hits that I'll get a little glut of broccoli (fingers crossed).

There are a few signs of spring in the garden that is getting me excited for warmer weather ahead:

Buds forming on my shatoot Mulberry.


Red frilly mustard started flowering. 

Blueberry flowers!

Down at the community garden I've been getting back into my digging after a little break in the cold weather. I've cleared and mulched a patch ready for spring planting. I'm hoping to have the rest of the bed cleared before November so I can utilise the full growing space. Still a lot of digging to go but definitely light at the end of the tunnel. Here is a link to my post with before pic if anyone's interested in comparing.

View of the bed from front corner. 

First part of the bed I cleared and planted back in April - garlic, potato onions & broad beans.

Broad beans are growing reasonably well. Lots of bushy growth. Hoping these guys spring into action with flowers and beans once the weather warms. The garlic is growing well. I did find a couple of the plants had been decapitated recently but they seem to be putting on new growth again - hopefully they still form good bulbs.

In the top pic you can make out poles and climbing net where I planted my peas this week. I'm not sure how these will go as I have mostly planted peas in autumn before. However, I think Canberra is cool enough that I should be able to get a good harvest before it gets too hot....fingers crossed.

I also discovered this week at the bed an unidentified allium plant left over from previous gardener. It looks like some kind of perennial bunching onion. Below are some pics if anyone can help with identification. I've dug up a few patches and spread them out so that will be a bonus harvest!



In other garden happenings I planted my first lot of spring seeds which I posted about during the week here. So, that's about where I'm at on the garden front. Not wanting to wish time away but I must admit I'm looking forward to spring.

How are things going in your garden?
What are you harvesting and planting?

4 comments

  1. Ooh lemons! I love love lemons. 😊 Do you preserve them?
    We are having rainy days so I didn't do anything in the garden in a couple of days.
    Not much to pick these days except some herbs, greens, and okra. There are several bitter gourds too, but they are still too small.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I do preserve lemons Nil - sadly haven't managed to grow enough myself to do so but have always managed to procure enough from others to keep my supply up. Yes, I imagine your harvests will be winding down about now.

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  2. What do you do with mangel wurzels? They're grown for animal fodder here but I've only seen them for sale once, in a farm shop, for carving alongside the pumpkins.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I treat them the same as beetroots Hazel. I don't let them grow as big as they probably do for fodder (or carving!!) - usually harvest at the size of a largish beetroot.

      Delete

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